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ROI: 1st Radio Commercial Sells 3 Condos

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History of Advertising

P.T. Barnum: The George Washington of Advertising

PT Barnum invented many of the techniques that we employ in advertising today. How many can you utilize in your business? Click here to read my article at adforum.com: P.T. Barnum: The George Washington of Advertising.

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History of Advertising

Why Paul Rand Transcended Design

Paul Rand is known as one of the most iconic graphic designers in American history, but his contributions are even greater than that. He elevated commercial artistry into graphic design. Previously, art directors were often known (behind their backs) as page decorators. Make it pretty, make it blue, send it through. Rand was one of the best, most articulate, most persuasive practioners to show companies the power of a corporate vocabulary — how their imagery (logo, colors, type, visuals, etc.) established how they were perceived in the marketplace. Other famous Rand logos were for UPS, Westinghouse and NeXT computers (for Steve Jobs).

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History of Advertising

Thanksgiving and the Selling of the New World

In 1620: The Mayflower lands at Plymouth [in now Massachusetts] with 102 people. The brutal winter kills half within five months. “Wild beasts and willd [sic] men” are all around them. This was the start of the settling — and then selling — of what became America. 100 years later, here's a drawing of Savannah, Georgia, showing the clean grid format the city still has today. The idea was to make it compelling for people to come and settle there.

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History of Advertising

How Accountable Advertising Became Insight Marketing

John Wanamaker is known in the biz for saying “Half the money I spend in advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” Jumping forward, direct marketing used to be called “accountable advertising”… because you could actually measure ROI, e.g., if AT&T spent x dollars on a mail campaign and got y number of responses, they could measure what was going on. The advertising was accountable to itself.

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History of Advertising

Pull The Powerful lever of Patriotism

This classic WWI poster has a one-word headline and a powerful image of a mother going to the bottom with her child. It refers to the German sinking of the passenger ship Lusitania. On Veteran's Day and in the aftermath of the great election upset, take a look at some war posters and consider the extraordinary power of patriotism in advertising. Patriotism pulls the same string that all of us who love this country share. Advertising has a long history of the federal government using it to sell war bonds, promote enlistment and a variety of other communications needs. And companies who participate in the war effort are quick to promote their role, too.Click here to view the gallery of war posters

This modern poster does the same thing. I started it at 2am when Trump won the election. I feel that this presidential campaign blew a hole in the heart of our country. Now we come together.

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History of Advertising

History of Advertising: Guess What Day It Is?

Hump Day! Geico is part of a long line of great ads in the insurance category. They are proof that you can do great work anywhere. It used to be an axiom that ‘serious’ verticals, like financial services, healthcare or insurance – demanded a tonality with gravitas. Often, it was built on the FUD technique – Fear, Uncertainty & Dread. This is no longer true. A modern example is Geico, who effectively uses humor, from camels to cavemen, to peddle their products. Continually great work by The Martin Agency, Richmond, Virginia. Learn more at the-voice.com/history-of-advertising.
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History of Advertising

Tom Thumb: Big Accomplishments From A Little Man

Click Here for a pocket history of advertising video on the great Tom Thumb. It was written, shot and edited by The Voice intern Ray Corriea, who is a dwarf, like Thumb. Ray is proud of the accomplishments of others like him, which he talks about in the piece. Ray is talented — an excellent cinematographer and editor. His footage was unique, too — you get an idea of what life looks like from 3 feet high. We would say "Shoot it on the Ray Cam." Book Ray for a new perspective on your next project!
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History of Advertising

When a Woman Ruled America: The Gibson Girl

Click here for a pocket lesson on The Gibson Girl. Drawn in pen & ink by Charles Dana Gibson, she was all the rage in turn of the century America. Unlike today's underfed waifs, the Gibson Girl was tall, athletic and full-bodied. Her hair was usually coiled up in a chignon and her eyes dreamy, bored, sexy. She was the epitome of style: women copied the high-waist fashion, songs were written about her, she appeared on everything from plates to wallpaper. It's a great example of how advertising is one of the best reflections of society's values and mores at any given time.
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History of Advertising

Listen To Ogilvy Before You Speak

Watch this Pocket Lesson about David Ogilvy and learn a few tips from a master that you can apply today. One of his most important tenants was to do your research. If you have a beer client: visit the brewery, read what the trades say, talk to consumers, drink the product. In this business, if you try to mail it in, clients will know. Most ad agencies have many clients and can never be the expert on the product that the customer is, but when you dive into the subject matter head first, you are rewarded with better, more profound communications.
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History of Advertising